DTN/The Progressive Farmer In-Depth

 

Soy Frontier at Middle Age

Optimists nicknamed Brazil's frontier "Soylandia" at the turn of the millennium, describing a country that would triple its soybean production in the next 15 years and suddenly rival the U.S. as world's largest soy producer and exporter. The country's unparalleled growth streak made paper millionaires out of many of Mato Grosso's pioneers and transformed landlocked farming regions. DTN's Executive Editor Marcia Zarley Taylor and South America Correspondent Alastair Stewart examine the successes as well as the challenges during the boom years and check what's ahead for Brazil's soybean growth as the frontier marks middle age.

Degraded pasture and raw land cost Mato Grosso soybean pioneers Darci Getulio Ferrarin Senior and Junior $160 per acre in 1998. With their sweat equity and paved roads, it now commands $6,900 per acre. (DTN photo by Marcia Zarley Taylor)

Inside You'll Find...

Stories:

How Brazil's Pioneers Rode the Soybean Boom - Optimists nicknamed Brazil's frontier "Soylandia" at the turn of the millenium, describing a country that would suddenly triple its soybean production in the next 15 years and rival the U.S. as world's largest soy producer and exporter. The country's unparalleled farming boom made paper millionaires out of many of Mato Grosso's pioneers. DTN's Marcia Zarley Taylor and Alastair Stewart reexamine the boom years and what's ahead for Brazil's soybean growth as the frontier marks middle age.
(May 15, 2015)

As Mato Grosso Soy Expands, Industry Can't Keep Up - Mato Grosso in Brazil has transformed into a global soybean powerhouse, but logistical headaches remain. While Mato Grosso will see more value-added agriculture expand over the next decade, a transformation like that seen in Iowa is unlikely.
(May 18, 2015)

Brazil's Northern Corridors Gear Up - Brazil's much-vaunted northern corridors will start to export increasingly large portions of the Mato Grosso grain crop over the next five years. Sending soy through the Amazon will reduce onerous logistics costs and stimulate planting across the state's northern frontiers.
(May 19, 2015)